Lesson Plan Support

COMING SOON!--

Lesson Plan Support from the History Dr

Are you an American history teacher struggling to design effective lesson plans that will excite and engage your students?

 

Are you tired of putting in hours designing and writing up your lesson plans for inspection by school officials, only to have a snow day, fire drill or away game decimate your preparation?

 

Do you wish you had ready, effective and usable lesson plans so you could move on to other issues that your constituents present?

 

You will soon be able to access a large and growing series of American history lesson plans that have been battle tested in real world classrooms. Some are stand-alone lessons to be executed in one period, others are projects that last for days. Your students will explore pivotal questions of political philosophy, build information gathering skills, become compelling public speakers, write persuasive essays and love American history all the while.

 

Here are lessons that actually work!

 

You can use them, right now, today. Your students will love your classes, your preparation work will be done for you, you will execute a fantastic and proven lesson plan that really works, your leadership team will applaud your work, parents will rave about what their young students are learning in school.

 

Here are just a few examples:

Rate The Colony, 1750. A conference to explore which colonial region had the most to offer potential immigrants from Europe. (5-10 class periods)

Resistance to the Stamp Act, 1765. Students assess acts of colonial defiance of the Stamp Act and connect tax protests from then to now. (one class period)

Shays Rebellion and the Politics of Debt, 1786. Students recreate the events leading to armed rebellion in Massachusetts when ex-Revolutionary War soldiers took up arms against their own state government. (3-4 class periods)

The Admissions Game, 1840: The simulation of a college admissions committee assessing the applications of famous Americans for the freshman class of the new United States University. (4-5 class periods)